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The People of Dublin, 1600-1799

David Dobson

Print Price: $21.50

Format: paper
Imprint: CFC
ISBN: 9780806358260
Pub Date: 2016
Print Pages: 158 pp.
Item: 8120

DESCRIPTION

By 1600 Dublin had become the most important city in Ireland. It was the administrative capital from which the English kings ruled or attempted to control the island of Ireland. The population of Dublin at that time has been estimated to have been in the region of 7,500; however, over the next two centuries--which was a period of relative prosperity and economic development--the population expanded to about 70,000 by 1700 and reached 180,000 in 1800.

During the 17th century the population was overwhelmingly Protestant, but by the late 18th century the Catholics were in the majority, resulting from the population moving from rural Ireland to Dublin, having been attracted by the economic and social benefits available there. In the 17th century there was an influx into Dublin of Protestants from within Ireland, as well as from England, and in late century French Huguenots and Dutch immigrants arrived as well. These immigrants brought with them industrial and commercial skills that broadened the economic base of Dublin and stimulated the introduction or expansion of the textile industries of linen, wool, and silk weaving, as well as sugar refining and metal work. Dublin in the 18th century was the center of government, commerce, and finance, and was an important entrepot with trade links to the British Isles, Europe, and across the Atlantic.

This genealogical source book by David Dobson identifies some of the inhabitants of Dublin between 1600 and 1800 who would otherwise be difficult to situate. It is based on primary sources found in Great Britain and Ireland as well as across the Atlantic. The sources include the Huguenot Society Publications; the Calendar of Patent & Close Rolls Ireland; records found in the State Paper Office, Dublin; the National Library of Ireland; and many more. Information on each of the 2,500 Dubliners in the volume includes the full name, occupation, a date, and the source, but on some occasions the entries also name family member(s), date of marriage or death, military theater served in, and additional information.